This simple dyslexia quiz is designed to detect whether you or your child fits the standard profile for dyslexia. The results will indicate how likely you or your child may be to have dyslexia, and we will provide ideas of what your next step should be, including the possibility that you or your child should have a professional evaluation.

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When a child has a learning disability like dyslexia, her whole household can be affected. Three brief interviews with Learning Ally students and parents show that helping a child succeed with reading and learning can translate into a positive experience for the...

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In this overview published by the International Dyslexia Association, parents can gain a deeper understanding of what an Multisensory Structured Language approach is and how it benefits the dyslexic learner. Download document below.

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Students with dyslexia need multisensory structured language (MSL) instruction. This means that teaching techniques are explicit, direct, cumulative, intensive, focused on the structure of language, and coordinating the use of visual, auditory, and kinesthetic–tactile pathways simultaneously to enhance memory and learning of written language. Connections are consistently reinforced between the symbols the student sees, the sounds the student hears, and the actions they can feel.

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Here we’ll help you to understand the importance and components of an effective multisensory structured language intervention program (MSL). We’ll also help you find an MSL tutor in your area.

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We’ve assembled a team of parents who not only have expert training, but who also have children who have learning differences. That means they understand this journey and are here to provide help and support. We call them our parent support specialists. Schedule a phone call for one-on-one advice about anything from effective reading interventions to parent/teacher collaboration strategies. You can schedule a phone call through your member dashboard or by calling 800.635.1403.'

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Drs. Sally and Bennett Shaywitz from Yale demystify dyslexia by using neuroscience to explain why dyslexia occurs, how remediation helps, and what strengths go along with this brain-based learning difference. This book is the go-to guide for many parents, educators and professionals. 

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Chapter 3 in this book by Susan L. Hall and Louisa C Moats outlines what it means to be an advocate and explains how to learn to advocate for your child.? The best quote to take away from this chapter is, Develop a language of persuasion rather than a language of positional battle.'

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Recommended book by Norma Franculla, Parent Support Specialist

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Parents are often the best educational advocates for their children, especially children with a learning disability. Brought to you by Reading Rockets, the Coordinated Campaign for Learning Disabilities developed the following tips to help parents champion their child.

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Have you heard these myths? • Ivy League and other competitive colleges don’t have to provide disability accommodations. • Colleges are required to provide the same accommodations that students received in high school. • If students didn’t have to take foreign language in high school, they don’t have to in college, either. • Students with disabilities will find college too challenging. Don’t let misinformation affect your student’s post-high school choices. Students with disabilities attend and graduate from all kinds of colleges - even the Ivies. While they have to adjust to academic expectations at college (as do all students) and will find changes in the disability accommodation system, with the proper preparation, they can enjoy success! Author and Columbia University learning specialist, Elizabeth Hamblet explains how the system for accommodations works at college, describes students’ rights and responsibilities within that system, and shares what the research says are the skills students should develop while they’re in high school to ensure success when they reach...

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