< Back

National Poetry Month: Featured Audiobook Titles

Categories: Books, Authors, & Movies

National Poetry Month was started by the Academy of American Poets in 1996.

Over the years, it has become the largest literary celebration in the world honoring poetry’s vital place in our culture. Poetry's rhythmic style and playful way of learning how to hear the syllables within words supports reading fluency. Breaking down words into smaller chunks aids in content comprehension, helping students to see the patterns within language and improve skills in ‘sounding out’ words.

We hope you enjoy this list of audiobooks we put together for you to introduce poetry to your students and get them reading.

 

What A Day It Was At School

Grade Level: K-5
When your science homework eats your dog, you spend lunch dodging flying food, and your backpack weighs a thousand pounds, you know you've got a great answer to the question, “What did you do at school today?”


 

Shout! Little Poems That Roar

Grade Level: K-3
This vibrant collection of twenty-one poems celebrates the joys (snack time!) and pitfalls (2 + 2 = 23?) of childhood. Brod Bagert's often silly, always winsome poems cover everything from the seasons and the stars to finger paint and kids who quack.


 

A Poem In Your Pocket

Grade Level: K-3
Usher in National Poetry Month with Mr. Tiffin and his students, stars of the hugely popular How Many Seeds in a Pumpkin? and The Apple Orchard Riddle.


 

The Raven And Other Favorite Poems

Grade Level: 9 an up
Features 41 of Poe's most memorable poems — among them "The Bells," "Ulalume," "Israfel," "To Helen," "The Conqueror Worm," "Eldorado" and "Annabel Lee" — reveal the extraordinary spectrum of Poe's personality and his virtuoso command of poetic language, rhythms and figures of speech. Alphabetic lists of titles and first lines.


 

The Charge Of The Light Brigade And Other Poems

Grade Level: 9 an up
Treasury of verse by the great Victorian poet includes the famous long narrative poem, Enoch Arden, plus "The Lady of Shalott," "The Charge of the Light Brigade," "Break, break, break," "Flower in the crannied Wall" and more. Also included are excerpts from three longer works: The Princess, "Maud" and "The Brook."


 

The Best Poems Ever

Grade Level: 7-9
Just in time for National Poetry Month, a fantastic collection of some of the best poems ever. These are some of the most amazing poems ever written, touching the heart, challenging the mind, and conjuring worlds of experience and imagination.


 

A Time To Dance

Grade Level: 7 and up
Padma Venkatraman s inspiring story of a young girl s struggle to regain her passion and find a new peace is told lyrically through verse that captures the beauty and mystery of India and the ancient bharatanatyam dance form.


 

Under The Mesquite

Grade Level: 7 and up
Lupita, a budding actor and poet in a close-knit Mexican American immigrant family, comes of age as she struggles with adult responsibilities during her mother's battle with cancer. A novel in verse.


 

Where The Sidewalk Ends

Grade Level: 4 and up
Shel Silverstein's masterful collection of poems and drawings is at once outrageously funny and profound.


 

Full Cicada Moon

Grade Level: 3-7
This historical middle-grade novel is told in poems from Mimi's perspective over the course of one year in her new town, and shows readers that positive change can start with just one person speaking up.


 

The Mouse Of Amherst

Grade Level: 3-7
Inspired, Emmaline writes her own first poem and secretly deposits it on Emily's desk. Emily answers with another poem, and a lively exchange begins. In this charming and fanciful introduction to Emily Dickinson, Elizabeth Spires demonstrates the power of poetry to express our deepest feelings, while Claire A. Nivola's delicate pencil drawings capture the intricacies of life in Emily's world.


 

The President's Stuck In The Bathtub

Grade Level: 3-7
In The President's Stuck in the Bathtub, the lives of the presidents are served up as fact-filled and fanciful poems that will make you laugh, cringe, and gasp with amazement at the colorful cast of men and women who have lived in the White House.